Planted Aquarium kaki

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mygis
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Re: Planted Aquarium kaki

#61 Post by mygis » Sun Nov 09, 2008 11:51 am

bernGPS wrote:Hi there,

I am in the midst of setting up a planted aquarium. Ultimate aim is to establish an aquarium with tropical fish (silver shark, red tail shark and gold fish so far) and aquatic plants that needs minimum maintenance and hopefully will be self cleaning.

I understanding that a good planted aquarium should have floride substrate. Where can I get this? Any idea? Went to a few aquarium shop but I get blank stares in reply.
Hi Berngps,

Just a note. I used to have a small aquarium at home until my kids started to spoil the lights and overfeeding the fish to death behind my back ...

My favorites were the Silver Shark Fish, a gentle specimen that lives in the mid-level of the aquarium. Another start of my collection was the Glass Cat-fish which is always a surprise to see in a small aquarium. The Glass Cat fish is slightly difficult to find in KL as it is imported (or was imported) and it is seasonal

Another common thing between these to species was the fact that they can coexist together without a fight and that they are not too demanding on the PH levels.

I will certainly re-start this hobby that I like as soon as my kids get slightly older.

Cheers.

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Re: Planted Aquarium kaki

#62 Post by LLCC » Wed Nov 12, 2008 9:52 am

mygis wrote: Hi Berngps,

Just a note. I used to have a small aquarium at home until my kids started to spoil the lights and overfeeding the fish to death behind my back ...

My favorites were the Silver Shark Fish, a gentle specimen that lives in the mid-level of the aquarium. Another start of my collection was the Glass Cat-fish which is always a surprise to see in a small aquarium. The Glass Cat fish is slightly difficult to find in KL as it is imported (or was imported) and it is seasonal

Another common thing between these to species was the fact that they can coexist together without a fight and that they are not too demanding on the PH levels.

I will certainly re-start this hobby that I like as soon as my kids get slightly older.

Cheers.
Bern, have you found your fluorite substrate? Available here in sg as Seachem Fluorite. http://www.seachem.com/Products/product ... urite.html However, you need not go to the expense of buying that good (but expensive) stuff. As you probably have discovered from your Salted-Vegetable-urn tank, some topsoil and a cap of gravel can grow plants as well, often better, than brand-name products.

mygis, the Silver Shark, common name Bala shark after its Binomial name Balantiocheilos melanopterus is actually a freshwater carp. It is a fast fish, and can grow to as large as a foot in length, so it'll not be too happy being housed in a small aquarium. A tank 4ft long will do nicely for this fish though.

If you have read my earlier post in this thread on setting up an NPT, I'd encourage you to restart your aquarium with this system - it will be ideal for your kids, as NPTs "prefers" to be overfed. Feed as much as the fish will eat, and then some more for the plants is the way to go for an NPT styled aquaria. Oh, and Do NOT Change water! Now, doesn't that appeal to almost all people? I mean who loves changing water? And who, (including adults) can resist feeding the fish when they see these fish begging even after a meal? With an NPT, you can do both.

Caveat: However, your NPT must be densely planted, growing profusely (that you can harvest the plants to exchange for fish food at the local fish shop), and be populated sparsely by fish. I say again, Densely planted, sparsely populated and NOT the other way. Do give it a shot and let us know how it grows. It's a great way to get kids started on gardening, animal care, and also learn how to balance an ecosystem by slowly introducing snails and shrimps caught on fishing trips with the kids...

LL
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Re: Planted Aquarium kaki

#63 Post by mygis » Wed Nov 12, 2008 2:36 pm

Hi Lawrence.

You are right. I will certainly give it another shot, However I will wait a bit until the small one get a bit older (2 years tops). What about the Glass catfish?

Cheers.

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Re: Planted Aquarium kaki

#64 Post by bernGPS » Wed Nov 12, 2008 5:54 pm

PalmoAnest wrote:Guys, it was a good read to this Q&A between Bern and LL.

I've 'accidentally' started a small planted tank for my sons too. Am still trying to read as much as possible to undo some of the wrong. Started the tank without knowing Nitrogen Cycle or any other related tings. :oops:

It has been the 3rd week and my tank is not very cloudy with about 6" visibility despite very frequent partial water change.

Bern, how's ur plants doing now?
The one in the "kiam chai ang" is doing well. Unfortunately quite a few of the fish has died as my daughters kept stirring the water and catching and releasing the fish. :ko: :cry: :cry:

The one in my aquarium doesnt seems to be doing too good at the moment. Leaves turning yellowy and seems to get thinner. I suspect its due to lack of nitrogen and UV light.

Need the advice of the expert, Lawrence.

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Re: Planted Aquarium kaki

#65 Post by LLCC » Wed Nov 12, 2008 5:57 pm

mygis wrote:Hi Lawrence.

You are right. I will certainly give it another shot, However I will wait a bit until the small one get a bit older (2 years tops). What about the Glass catfish?

Cheers.
Glass catfish ( Kryptopterus bicirrhis) are schooling fish. Never buy 1 or 2. Buy 6 to a dozen to gain any success. Otherwise, they quickly die from heartache or loneliness I guess. Being scaleless fish, they do not take kindly to medications, or sudden great changes to their environment and water. They do better with living plants.

That said, the 4ft NPT aquarium will be ideal. Live plants, no water changes, make it a very stable environment for them. However, if you introduce them to an old NPT, it is wise to do a 50% water change before you attempt to drip acclimatise them to the water, for fear that the water become too "lopsided" in parameters.

They are relatively slow fish, and initially are shy. Once stabilised, they are hardy fish and very greedy. You can see the food they gulp down through the stomach. I've had mine for around 3 years till i got tired of the look and swopped them for other fish. In that time, they only grew by less than one cm. I think these don't grow big anyway.

Mine never spawned so I have no experience in breeding these. However, I notice they easily break their 2 whiskers by swimming into things! Clumsy. But it doesn't seem to affect them and it grows back quickly without any sign of the damage.

The Glass catfish has a dorsal fin, although it looks like it doesn't. In fact it looks like a mini X-ray version of the Ikan Tapah. But one can only see the fin after it is dead - use a needle and pry it out of a socket in its back that it hides the fin most of the time. Hence the name Kryptopterus, meaning hidden fin. Wonder which evolutionary force compelled it to hide its dorsal?



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Re: Planted Aquarium kaki

#66 Post by bernGPS » Wed Nov 12, 2008 6:11 pm

mygis wrote: Hi Berngps,

Just a note. I used to have a small aquarium at home until my kids started to spoil the lights and overfeeding the fish to death behind my back ...

My favorites were the Silver Shark Fish, a gentle specimen that lives in the mid-level of the aquarium. Another start of my collection was the Glass Cat-fish which is always a surprise to see in a small aquarium. The Glass Cat fish is slightly difficult to find in KL as it is imported (or was imported) and it is seasonal

Another common thing between these to species was the fact that they can coexist together without a fight and that they are not too demanding on the PH levels.

I will certainly re-start this hobby that I like as soon as my kids get slightly older.

Cheers.
I love the Silver Shark too as they are fast swimmer with pretty flashes of silver. I will drop in at your place to have a look the next time I go to KL.

Gosh, just cant believe we live next to each other for many weekends during my 4 year sojourn in the Peninsula.
LLCC wrote: Bern, have you found your fluorite substrate? Available here in sg as Seachem Fluorite. http://www.seachem.com/Products/product ... urite.html However, you need not go to the expense of buying that good (but expensive) stuff. As you probably have discovered from your Salted-Vegetable-urn tank, some topsoil and a cap of gravel can grow plants as well, often better, than brand-name products.

LL
Hi LLCC,

I have been very busy the last few trips back to Kuching. No, I have not found the perfect fluorite substrate yet. Probably will try to source for the burnt soil from my dad's garden again when I go back during Christmas.

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Re: Planted Aquarium kaki

#67 Post by mygis » Wed Nov 12, 2008 6:13 pm

BernGPS wrote:I love the Silver Shark too as they are fast swimmer with pretty flashes of silver. I will drop in at your place to have a look the next time I go to KL.

Gosh, just cant believe we live next to each other for many weekends during my 4 year sojourn in the Peninsula.
Bring you laser pathfinder and we will measure the exact distance ... 20 - 30 meters? Perhaps we always take different lifts.

#-o

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Re: Planted Aquarium kaki

#68 Post by bernGPS » Wed Nov 12, 2008 6:27 pm

mygis wrote:
Bring you laser pathfinder and we will measure the exact distance ... 20 - 30 meters? Perhaps we always take different lifts.

#-o
I always take the lift closer to Fawina

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Re: Planted Aquarium kaki

#69 Post by LLCC » Wed Nov 12, 2008 6:47 pm

bernGPS wrote:The one in the "kiam chai ang" is doing well. Unfortunately quite a few of the fish has died as my daughters kept stirring the water and catching and releasing the fish. :ko: :cry: :cry:

The one in my aquarium doesnt seems to be doing too good at the moment. Leaves turning yellowy and seems to get thinner. I suspect its due to lack of nitrogen and UV light.

Need the advice of the expert, Lawrence.
No expert here. Just experience gained from making foolish mistakes.

Yellow leaves are a sign of:
1) Lack of light - change your light tube if old, increase the light timer to max 12 hrs/day, or add another tube if you have reached 12 hrs/day
2) Deficiency - see below.
3) Very fast new growth - congratulations, your plants have taken off after a period of dormancy. Young leaves are normally light, yellowish green, appearing at the crown.

There is a possibility of macronutrient deficiency, possibly Nitrogen, Phosphate, magnesium or Iron.

Signs:
Old leaves turn yellowish, new leaves are smaller, slow growing and often deformed. Eventually plant dies - Nitrogen deficiency.

Old leaves fall off prematurely. All leaves not as dark green as when you first planted them - Phosphorus deficiency.

Old leaves show yellow areas and the tips and edges start to wither - Potassium deficiency.

New leaves show yellow areas and the tips and edges start to wither - Magnesium deficiency.

New leaves grow out yellowish and do not darken in colour - Sulfur deficiency.

New leaves grow and darken, then turn yellow. Leaf blade is yellow, but the leave nerves are green. Most easily observed in fast growing broad leaved plants like Echinodorus. Iron deficiency.

If you think that I'm repeating myself in the signs above, that's because deficiencies are often interrelated and they are really hard to identify for a first timer (like trying to identify the ailment by looking a the tongue like a Chinese sinseh). Mg, K and Fe affect each other, so they are interrelated. Then there is Ca that comes into play when the 3 are met.

Basically, deficiency is seen among people who drive their plants hard by using bright lights, CO2 injection and heavy fertiliser doses without giving sufficient water changes to dilute buildups of single minerals.

In an NPT, you don't use bright lights, and never supplement CO2, so plant's growth rates are slow and thus they can adapt to any deficiency well. Moreover, the topsoil base layer acts like a mineral sump and it generates its own minerals for plant use too, by breaking down food, detritus and dead leaves by bacterial action, into minerals for the plants again.

In most NPT cases, it is lack of light that cause yellowing, followed by owner's anxiety. Plants grow slower, some go into dormancy in an NPT than that in a Hi-tech CO2-enriched tank. Therefore you may be over expecting.

Give time for observation. Start by the simplest to reverse action - Light.

Increase timer, to not more than 12 hours a day. If you are already there, then check that it actually worked 12 hours a day, and didn't get turned on and off. also check that the tube is not old and dim, otherwise, replace. Then increase another light of same power, and drop timer to 8 hours max.

Observe for 2-4 weeks before making any more change.

Old leaves will eventually die. Yellowed leaves seldom recover, so don't fret that you're doing wrong. Instead, look for new growth. If it is growing new leaves, and growing healthy, then, you're on the right track.

Happy planting.

LL
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Re: Planted Aquarium kaki

#70 Post by bernGPS » Wed Nov 12, 2008 8:28 pm

Thanks LL for sharing the knowledge

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